The Web3 Stack, 2019 Edition

By Kyle Samani

| 12 minute read

A year ago, I illustrated [the Web3 stack as I understood it at the time. I have learned more, and the ecosystem has evolved since then, so I decided to update the Web3 stack. Whereas the 2018 Edition was just a flat visualization of a single instance of the Web3 stack, the 2019 Edition aims to show the Web3 stack as a set of interoperable networks. In order to do this, I organized the 2019 Edition into 4 images (plus a bonus), starting from a narrow view, and zooming out from there.

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The Web3 Stack, 2019 Edition

A year ago, I illustrated [the Web3 stack as I understood it at the time. I have learned more, and the ecosystem has evolved since then, so I decided to update the Web3 stack. Whereas the 2018 Edition was just a flat visualization of a single instance of the Web3 stack, the 2019 Edition aims to show the Web3 stack as a set of interoperable networks. In order to do this, I organized the 2019 Edition into 4 images (plus a bonus), starting from a narrow view, and zooming out from there.

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